Posts filed under ‘Kawai Nui Marsh’

Service project at Ulupo Heiau on Dec. 8th

You’re invited to kokua (help) and malama (care for) Ulupo Heiau on Saturday, Dec 8th starting at 8:30 a.m. and going to 12:30 p.m. Ulupo Heiau (Night of Inspiration) one of the first sacred temples to have built as a “mapele” (agriculture) heiau by the first people or menehune and dedicated to Kaneulupo. The Kailua Hawaiian Civic Club and ‘Ahahui Malama i ka Lokahi are the co-curators at this State Historic site complex and conduct service projects every second Saturday of the month to restore the Hawaiian ethno-botanical and culutral features.We meet at the parking area by the Heiau and behind the Windward YMCA.Bring: Lunch, water, rain gear, sunscreen, work gloves.If you can, also bring tools such as sickles, handsaws, machete, hand cultivators or chain saws.For more info and to signup: call Kaimi Scudder at 593-0112 or email at “email@ahahui.net”If you have not been to Ulupo Heiau in the last year or so, you are in for a big surprise. See what community volunteers can do to malama ‘aina!

December 3, 2007 at 7:58 pm Leave a comment

Birds of the Marsh Tour (Kawai Nui, Hamakua & Kaelepulu)

On Saturday, December 1st, Ron Walker a wildlife biologist with Ahahui Malama i ka Lokahi will lead a tour of the Kailua Waterways, which includes Kawai Nui Marsh, the Hamakua State Wildlife Sanctuary and the private Kaelepulu Wetlands Preserve. We will carpool from the meeting site. A donation of $5.00 would be appreciated. Be prepared with sunscreen, rain gear and good footwear. It is anticipated that the tour will finish about 11:30 AM at Kaelepulu. For reservations and more information, contact Rick Kaimi Scudder at 593-0112 or email <email@ahahui.net>

November 21, 2007 at 8:34 pm Leave a comment

‘Ahahui Malama I Ka Lokahi receives a Grant from the Office of Hawaiian Affairs (OHA) for the restoration of Na Pohaku o Hauwahine in Kawai Nui Marsh, O‘ahu, a Ramsar Wetland of International Importance.

‘Ahahui Malama I Ka Lokahi receives a Grant from the Office of Hawaiian Affairs (OHA) for the restoration of Na Pohaku o Hauwahine in Kawai Nui Marsh, O‘ahu, a Ramsar Wetland of International Importance.

‘Ahahui Malama i ka Lokahi (AML) is pleased to announce that it has been awarded a grant of $23,066 from the Office of Hawaiian Affairs (OHA) to revegetate endemic plant species and create a wetland bird habitat for the endangered ‘Alae ula (Hawaiian gallinule) at Na Pohaku o Hauwahine in Kawai Nui Marsh, O‘ahu, a Ramsar Wetlands of International Importance. The award is for a one-year period.  As curator of the site, AML works closely with the State DLNR-Division of State Parks and Division of Forestry and Wildlife to protect and enhance the site’s cultural, ecological, and archaeological treasures.

AML will use a part-time person skilled in Hawaiian cultural practices and the restoration of Hawaii’s natural resources to help lead the restoration efforts by volunteer individuals and groups and assist with teacher-training at Na Pohaku o Hauwahine. AML will improve the water pumping system, which is needed during dry periods. AML will also acquire from native Hawaiian plant growers a range of native dry forest plants and associated plant propagation supplies that would allow for the continued expansion of the 12-acre planted areas of Na Pohaku o Hauwahine. AML will enlist the services of college students and professors and other volunteer professionals in the GPS and GIS mapping of on-site botanical and cultural resources of Na Pohaku o Hauwahine.

AML has received grants in the past from the LEF Foundation, Ducks Unlimited, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the North American Wetlands Conservation Act for the dryland forest and wetland bird habitat restoration at Na Pohaku o Hauwahine. The OHA grant will allow for continued work through 2008.  AML will also seek a Ramsar Convention Grant to promote the Kawai Nui/Hamakua Marsh Complex as one of the United States’ 22 wetlands of international importance.

‘Ahahui Malama I Ka Lokahi’s mission is to develop, promote, and practice a Native Hawaiian conservation ethic relevant to our times that is responsible to both the Hawaiian culture and science. This ethic is protective of native cultural and natural heritage and is expressed through research, education, and active stewardship. AML’s website is http://www.ahahui.net.

November 14, 2007 at 10:46 pm Leave a comment

Malama Na Pohaku o Hauwahine – service project

The third Saturday of the month is our scheduled service project day to malama Na Pohaku o Hauwahine. We will meet Saturday, Nov. 17th from 8:30am-12:30pm at Na Pohaku o Hauwahine located along Kapa’a Quarry Rd. (about a mile in from Pali Hwy.) to work on several different projects, weeding in the native plant areas, clearing alien plants, hauling in mulch, planting native plants or restoring the wetland bird habitat. Dress in work clothes with covered shoes, bring gloves, a cutting or digging tool, your canteen of water and snack. Contact Kaimi Scudder at 593-0112 or Malia Bird Helela to register for the service project. Email <email@ahahui.net>

November 9, 2007 at 11:17 pm Leave a comment

Help restore the Hawaiian ethno-botanical landscape at Ulupo Heiau

You’re invited to kokua (help) and malama (care for) Ulupo Heiau on Saturday, Nov 10th starting at 8:30 a.m. and going to 12:30 p.m. Ulupo Heiau (Night of Inspiration) one of the first sacred temples to have built as a “mapele” (agriculture) heiau by the first people or menehune and dedicated to Kaneulupo. The Kailua Hawaiian Civic Club and ‘Ahahui Malama i ka Lokahi are the co-curators at this State Historic site complex and conduct service projects every second Saturday of the month to restore the Hawaiian ethno-botanical and culutral features.
We meet at the parking area by the Heiau and behind the Windward YMCA.
Bring: Lunch, water, rain gear, sunscreen, work gloves.
If you can, also bring tools such as sickles, handsaws, machete, hand cultivators or chain saws.
For more info and to signup: call Kaimi Scudder at 593-0112 or email at “email@ahahui.net”
If you have not been to Ulupo Heiau in the last year or so, you are in for a big surprise. See what community volunteers can do to malama ‘aina!

November 3, 2007 at 1:07 am 1 comment

Archaeology tour of Kawai Nui Marsh, Oahu

Ahahui Malama i ka Lokahi, the Kailua Hawaiian Civic Club and The Kawai Nui Heritage Foundation will conduct a Hawaiian archaeology tour in Kawai Nui Marsh on Saturday November 3rd. Anthropologist Paul Brennan and Archaeologist Martha Yent of State Parks will show and speak on the archaeological features at the Ulupo Heiau complex, Na Pohaku o Hauwahine and Pahukini Heiau located in Kapa’a Valley. They will explain how these sites were used in ancient and historic periods and of present plans by Hawaiian organizations, State and Federal agencies to protect and restore these sacred sites. New and kama’aina residents in Kailua are encouraged to come. The tour will start at 8:30 am and be completed by 12:30 pm. A donation of $5 is requested. To obtain more information contact Kaimi Scudder at 593-0112, or email: Malia Bird Helela at <hemanumalia@hotmail.com> for more information and registration.

October 25, 2007 at 1:42 am Leave a comment

Help Malama Ulupo Heiau on Sat. Oct. 13th

You’re invited to kokua (help) and malama (care for) Ulupo Heiau on Saturday, Oct. 13th starting at 8:30 a.m. and going to 12:30 p.m. Ulupo Heiau (Night of Inspiration) one of the first sacred temples to have built as a “mapele” (agriculture) heiau by the first people or menehune and dedicated to Kaneulupo. The Kailua Hawaiian Civic Club and ‘Ahahui Malama i ka Lokahi are the co-curators at this State Historic site complex and conduct service projects every second Saturday of the month to restore the Hawaiian ethno-botanical and culutral features.
We meet at the parking area by the Heiau and behind the Windward YMCA.
Bring: Lunch, water, rain gear, sunscreen, work gloves.
If you can, also bring tools such as sickles, handsaws, machete, hand cultivators or chain saws.
For more info and to signup: call Kaimi Scudder at 593-0112 or email at “email@ahahui.net”
If you have not been to Ulupo Heiau in the last year or so, you are in for a big surprise. See what community volunteers can do to malama ‘aina!

October 4, 2007 at 4:24 am Leave a comment

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